Done, done and done!

I can’t believe I actually did it! 50,000 words in one month!

Now I’m not trying to make those who didn’t make it feel bad (and honestly, there is still time), but I can’t contain my excitement. I was really starting to freak out!

When my laptop broke down on me (thank goodness for hard drives); I moved to my surface. When my surface died (I lost the charger); I moved to my sister’s laptop. And when that wasn’t available, I used my phone. I even had a brief pen and paper stint (I don’t talk about those times)

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Crunch Time

So I’m 40,000 words in and I have 10,000 words left to conquer; and I am freaking out.

My day today is full, when will I find time to write? And I only have today, tomorrow and the day after.

FreakOut10,000 words. It’s not so bad. Right?

Dear readers and writers, if you have any tips, any tips at all as to how to reach 10,000 words; I am all ears.

Somebody, anybody…EEEEEEEK!!!!

My First Poetry Slam

So last Saturday I took part in my first spoken word poetry competition and I learnt A LOT.

The Eko Literary Society is the premier society in Lagos for lovers of books, poetry and all things literary and they founded the Eko Poetry Slam, which in collaboration with Metro 97.7 FM and Radio One 103.5 FM, took place last Saturday. It would be the first edition. Their previous poetry slams have been in Abuja. Ken the Slammaster was our host, and I thoroughly enjoyed his witty comments at the end of each poet’s performance.

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32,000 words and sweating…

It’s getting close to the final date. And I’m only 32,000 words in.

The worry is starting to set in, and the doubt. Can I do it?

I failed to write a post noting the start of my Nanowrimo journey on the 1st November (actually started poorly – with only 400 words); but I did start and now it is crunch time.

In order to make the goal of 50,000 words I have to write 18,000 words in five days. That’s 3,600 words a day. That is no small feat.

But if the last few months have taught me anything it is that:

  • I can do alllll things through Christ
  • 3,600 words ain’t nothing if you have the right amount of desperation; and I’ve sooooo got that. There is noooo way I am failing another Nanowrimo.

How do I plan to do it?

I have come to realize that 500 words is fairly easy for me to write. 1000 words is on a medium level. Anything after that feels like that point during your jogging stretch that your muscles begin to cry out. So I will be breaking my 3600 words to bites of 600 during the course of the day. I’ll write 600 words now and maybe another 600 in an hour or two. If the words are really flowing I’ll continue to 1,000 but no further.

What surprises me and makes the task slightly easier is that I actually still like my story; I’m still engaged. I don’t want to cut myself so I never write again. I also recognize that the story won’t be over at 50,000 words and this doesn’t freak me out (at least not much).

So I congratulate myself in advance for making it – 50000 words in 30 days.

Touch

This little piece was born out of a prompt from the Qamina Writing Workshop.

The prompt requires you to write a story that ends with the following sentence:

But you are free to do it and I am free to let you. Because look, look. Look where your hands are. Now.

I found the task challenging and fun. Check out my piece below:

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Young and Cerebral Essay Competition

Oyinkansola the Judge…Yup! I like the sound of that!

Young and Cerebral in their justified concern for the youths of Nigeria and how detached and uninformed they are of their culture, their language and their history, have put together an essay competition…

The Essay Competition is an initiative of Young & Cerebral, a youth development platform that raises awareness on how young people can make better choices in their careers, business and life.

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The Stories from African Pens

African literature is a genre in and of itself. And it is one that I have always admired, albeit from a safe distance.

For me African literature is like a gobstopper – strong, distinct but difficult to eat. Like a painting that is beautiful but has you turning your head this way and that, wondering if perhaps the gallery accidentally placed it upside down. It is like listening to someone telling you how your body works on the inside, and though you knoooooww what they are saying is true…you forget the lesson as it comes.

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